Why do you hate helping people?

35 Questions

This is part 35 in a series of 35 questions. It is based on a series of questions answered by John Hawkins for Townhall.com: here, and here.


35. why do you hate helping people?

Define helping.

There’s the old saying, “Give a man a fish, he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he’ll eat for a lifetime.”

Liberals want to give the man a fish. Every day. No questions asked. Forever. But, where do they get the fish to give the man? From the man that conservatives are teaching to fish.

Conservatives want to teach the man to fish. We also don’t want to oppress him with needless and overbearing regulations while he tries to fish. We don’t want to make it harder for him to get his fish. We also don’t want to take his fish to give to others who don’t want to earn their own fish; he should enjoy the fruits of his labor.

It’s a common theme among liberals to complain about conservatives “not helping” people, but it is a verifiable fact that conservatives do more to help people than liberals do.

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Why do you think a lot of conservatives are so receptive to stern father types on cable news and talk radio?

35 Questions

This is part 34 in a series of 35 questions. It is based on a series of questions answered by John Hawkins for Townhall.com: here, and here.


34. Why do you think a lot of conservatives are so receptive to stern father types on cable news and talk radio?

I’m not even going to try. John Hawkin’s answer is classic. Scroll down to number 14.

Okay, it’s better than being receptive to bleeding heart mommy types.

How do conservatives square 8 yrs of calling Obama a tyrant while supporting an actual tyrant?

35 Questions

This is part 33 in a series of 35 questions. It is based on a series of questions answered by John Hawkins for Townhall.com: here, and here.


33. How do conservatives square 8 yrs of calling Obama a “tyrant” while supporting an actual tyrant?

Obama was not a tyrant, but I understand why many people considered him one; he did tend to rule by executive order. Actually, he abused them. If he couldn’t get something done through Congress, the way he was supposed to, he got it done through the bureaucracies (EPA regulations), executive orders, or abuse of governmental powers (Tea Party targeting by IRS). He did have a reputation for being a bit dictatorial.

Trump has not exhibited anything different that Obama. He’s simply using the same executive order process, but he’s undoing the damage done by his predecessor. He’s also working to get the bureaucracies, such as the EPA, back under control. Congress is supposed to make law, not bureaucracies. And he’s also working to get politics out of certain governmental organizations.

I don’t see tyrant when I see Trump. Not any more than I saw tyrant in Obama.

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Do you think Christian refugees are more deserving of American assistance than non-Christian refugees?

35 Questions

This is part 32 in a series of 35 questions. It is based on a series of questions answered by John Hawkins for Townhall.com: here, and here.


32. Do you think Christian refugees are more deserving of American assistance than non-Christian refugees?

Unlike, Hawkins, I don’t put a higher priority on Christians over non-Christians, but with that being said, Christianity is the most persecuted religion in the world1,2. Most of the refugees are not being persecuted, but are simply being bombed out of their homes and have no place to go. That doesn’t mean they all are, but it also doesn’t mean we should just be letting people in without being vetted.

I also think that Christians are going to assimilate more to surroundings in the United States, or any country for that matter, more than non-Christians, i.e., Muslims. Why? There’s nothing in the Christian religion that says not to assimilate. Certainly, there are worldly things that we need to stay away from, or partake in moderation, but that doesn’t mean we can’t fit in with our neighbors. Islam is more opposed assimilation, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. I have coworkers that are Islamic, and we get along just fine. That doesn’t mean all Muslims think that way, and one simply has to watch the news to see that there are a large number that absolutely will not assimilate. In fact, they believe we need to assimilate to them.


  1. Clark, Kelly James. The Most Persecuted Religion in the World. HuffPost News. Web. 4 Jan 2013. Accessed: 12 Apr 2017. 

  2. Burns, Peter. Christians are the world’s most-persecuted religion – here’s how they react under fire. Washington Examiner. Web. 18 Sep 2017. Accessed: 20 May 2018. 

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Why is the religious freedom of an anti-LGBT baker more important than that of a Muslim soldier or physician?

35 Questions

This is part 31 in a series of 35 questions. It is based on a series of questions answered by John Hawkins for Townhall.com: here, and here.


31. why is the religious freedom of an anti-LGBT baker important to you, but not a Muslim soldier or physician?

There must be a story to go with this somewhere, but I’m not sure what it is. In a nutshell, though, the religious freedoms of all Americans should be respected, but there are some limitations, just like the Freedom Speech restriction of “You can’t yell fire in a crowded theater.” So, let’s talk about this for a moment to correct some misconceptions.

First, most Christian bakers, florists, photographer, etc. do not discriminate against gay people. They discriminate against events. If a gay person comes into a bakery, the Christian baker will sell the gay person bread, cookies, cake, whatever. It’s when asked to provide a wedding cake for a wedding event that creates the problem. I would be surprised if you didn’t get the same reaction from an Islamic baker, but I wonder if activists would flip out over that. Most Christians are not “against gay people.” They’re against homosexuality, and they separate the two. One is an action, a sin, and that is what they won’t condone. Quite frankly, Christians are supposed to discriminate against sin!

Muslim soldiers and physicians also have a right to practice their religion, and I haven’t heard of any instances where they have not been afforded that right. That doesn’t mean it hasn’t happened, but it’s certainly not on the scale that Christian rights have been attacked.

I wonder if a Muslim baker would be attacked in the media for not baking a wedding cake for a gay wedding the same way Christians have. Would Muslim bakers have to be “reeducated?”

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