Skip to content

Month: April 2008

Life, Part 1

Last Sunday, during a ‘Compassion Forum’ sponsored by the not-for-profit group Faith in Public Life at Messiah College in Pennsylvania, Democratic Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, said, “the potential for life begins at conception.”

According to Dictionary.com, conception is “fertilization; inception of pregnancy.” According to Merriam-Webster OnLine, conception is “the process of becoming pregnant involving fertilization or implantation or both.”

The definition of conception is not the beginning of life, but the beginning of a new individual. Life, is already present.

It’s time for a quick review of basic sex education. Man and woman come together. Man provides sperm–a living cell. Woman provides egg–a living cell. When the living sperm comes together with the living egg, fertilization takes place. The living sperm and the living egg transfer their two lives to one living embryo. One plus one equal one.

What this means, is that life is an ongoing, unbroken chain. It began as a gift, given from God to Adam and Eve. Ever since, men and women have been passing that gift to their children. Pregnancy is not new life, it is a new individual who now has the gift of life that has been passed from two parents. There is no new life. In order for there to be new life, there would have been no life at some point during the process, which means that one of the cells involved would have had to have died. When we bring new life into the world, it is a figure of speech. So life does not begin, or renew, or whatever, with pregnancy, it continues or transfers.

The potential for life begins during sex. Pregnancy begins, at conception, once the transfer of life is complete.

Leave a Comment

from “Memoirs Of Jacques Casanova de Seingalt 1725-1798”

The Memoirs Of Jacques Casanova de Seingalt 1725-1798 encompasses six huge volumes. I had intended to read the whole set, but only made through his military career in volume 1. With everything else I have to do, it would have taken me years to read at the pace I was going.

Towards the end of my reading, in Chapter XIV, I came across this conversation between Casanova and Yusuf Ali regarding atheism:

He added that the existence of God could be useful only to those who did not entertain a doubt of that existence, and that, as a natural consequence, Atheists must be the most miserable of men. God has made in man His own image in order that, amongst all the animals created by Him, there should be one that can understand and confess the existence of the Creator. Without man, God would have no witness of His own glory, and man must therefore understand that his first and highest duty is to glorify God by practising justice and trusting to His providence.

“Observe, my son, that God never abandons the man who, in the midst of misfortunes, falls down in prayer before Him, and that He often allows the wretch who has no faith in prayer to die miserably.”

“Yet we meet with Atheists who are fortunate and happy.”

“True; but, in spite of their tranquillity, I pity them because they have no hope beyond this life, and are on a level with animals. Besides, if they are philosophers, they must linger in dark ignorance, and, if they never think, they have no consolation, no resource, when adversity reaches them. God has made man in such a manner that he cannot be happy unless he entertains no doubt of the existence of his Divine Creator; in all stations of life man is naturally prone to believe in that existence, otherwise man would never have admitted one God, Creator of all beings and of all things.”

“I should like to know why Atheism has only existed in the systems of the learned, and never as a national creed.”

“Because the poor feel their wants much more than the rich, There are amongst us a great many impious men who deride the true believers because they have faith in the pilgrimage to Mecca. Wretches that they are, they ought to respect the ancient customs which, exciting the devotion of fervent souls, feed religious principles, and impart courage under all misfortunes. Without such consolation, people would give way to all the excess of despair.”

Leave a Comment